05 February 2011

You know...

...I think those silly Russians may have been onto something after all.  I've always struggled with praying Sunday Matins before the Divine Service (first Divine Service here is at 7:45 a.m.).  Many Sundays I succeeded in getting through the words, but hardly with the spirit of thoughtfulness and devotion they require.  Today I prayed Saturday's Evening Prayer at Church and went right into Sunday's Morning Prayer and prayed the whole thing (including the Paschal Blessing at the end) and when it was done, I realized:  that really works.  I have all the time in the world to finish the Psalms, no distractions in preparing for the next liturgy.  I think I may turn Slavic on Saturday afternoons/evenings and make it a habit for the future.  Anyone want to join me for an Evening Prayer/Morning Prayer?  Be at St. Paul's at 4 on Saturdays!

P.S.  A pity that the Starke Te Deum isn't offered in place of "You are God."  I suppose it could be substituted.

11 comments:

Past Elder said...

Ich bin erstaunt! What happened with you is what happened with Matins anyway. That's exactly how a morning office became a night office as the monking world monked its monkeries. Gott hilf mir seitlich if next you won't start calling it Vigil and the cycle will be complete!

William Weedon said...

I could call it an All Night Vigil like the Russians and have it last what? 45 minutes???

David Clapper said...

Is the Paschal Blessing in LSB or the Treasury? I can't seem to find it. Morning Prayer references Hymn 939, but that's only (!) the Te Deum ...

William Weedon said...

Only in Altar Book and Builder.

Chris said...

It's not just the Russians who pray Matins (Orthros) and then go right into the Divine Liturgy, but the Greeks, Arabs and all who follow the Typikon of the Great Church of Christ

William Weedon said...

Christopher,

I didn't know that. I thought the Antiochians always celebrated Orthros before the Mass.

Dixie said...

Chris, I think what Pastor Weedon is saying is that he wants to move his Matins to the night before...Saturday night. Apparently the Russian Orthodox do this? I am unfamiliar with the practice--except when it is done on Pascha. In the Greek Church and the Antiochian I have been to I have seen Orthros done just before the Liturgy on Sunday - not Saturday night. Of course, with the understanding that after sundown is the new day...it would work, I guess.

Pastor Weedon...you say it is a struggle. You betcha! I went to Orthros this Sunday...did not eat because I was going to go to Holy Communion...but more importantly, did not drink any coffee and I could hardly stay awake and keep from yawning. My mind was traveling every which way out of my control. I was frustrated...very frustrated. But I came to realize that the struggle wasn't a bad thing. The fathers tell us not to allow our minds to travel at will. I probably should go to Orthros more often and practice this discipline!

melxiopp said...

An All-Night Vigil in the Russian tradition takes 2-3 hours. It is actually just a parish version of the monastic All-Night Vigil, which starts later and lasts longer. There are any number of hymns, rubrics, processions, readings, etc. that can be used at an All-Night Vigil, that extend the service, as well as slower and expanded arrangements for the chanting and singing that add time, too. There are also usually other minor services added to the series, e.g., First Hour, Inter-Hours, Typika, Litya, etc. meaning the single All-Night Vigil is made up of more than just Matins and Vespers.

I find it far easier to stay up all night than to wake up early. Given the chronic tardiness of Greeks and Slavs, extra long service like this also assure people will be there before the end.

David Garner said...

I believe you are correct, Pastor Weedon - in our Antiochian parish, we have Vespers the night before, and Orthros the next morning immediately before the Divine Liturgy. This was also the practice in the one other Antiochian parish I have visited.

Past Elder said...

Well, gee, as PW is Western church, maybe he'll come full circle with all this "It's meant for this time but that's a pain so we'll do it that time" stuff and do a Vatican II, abolish Matins and call it an Office of Readings that can be said whenever.

Chris said...

It all depends. I misspoke earlier when I referred to the Typikon. Those who use the Typikon Mar-El-Sabbas will typically do the all night vigil (vespers, orthros and 1st hour). The Typikon Mar-El-Sabbas is the standard for the Slavic Churches, but some churches who use the Typikon of the Great church of Christ (which includes the Antiochians and the Greeks) still do all night vigils, mainly in monasteries and the preferred parish practice is to have Vespers the night before and then Orthros the morning of the feast or Sunday.