25 February 2006

Patristic Quote for the Day

It is not just the death that creates the martyr, but also the disposition. For often the martyr's crown is woven not just from the way out, but also from the will. Indeed, it is not I, but Paul who gives this definition of martyrdom when he speaks in this way: "I I die every day." (1 Cor. 15:31) - St. John Chrysostom, *On Saint Eustathius* par. 5

9 comments:

Christopher Hall said...

What a great quotation! Thank you.

cheryl said...

Doesn't the Church regard some individuals as martyrs, because of their extreme suffering for Christ, even though they never actually died? I've heard Mary refered to, as, "Queen of Martyrs" before, and I'm thinking there was someone else I read about not too long ago (the name escapes me at the moment).

Or is this just a roman thing?

Chris Jones said...

Cheryl

If there is such an attitude I think it's just a Roman thing (although I haven't heard it). Those who suffer for the faith, but not to the point of death, are usually referred to as "Confessors" (like my main man, St Maximus).

If our Lady is Queen of Heaven, then she is Queen of the martyrs even though she is not a martyr herself. She's also Queen of the patriarchs, prophets, doctors, confessors, and every righteous spirit made perfect in faith. That doesn't make her a patriarch or confessor, herself, either.

William Weedon said...

I'd agree with Chris, Cheryl. Though what is this IF business? ; )

cheryl said...

Thanks guys.

I think it may be due to the fact that many roman catholics are trying to push for the co-redemptrix thing ie that she died with Christ, in her mother's heart. Although I thought I heard of another saint being spoken of in a similiar manner (I wish for the world, I could remember their name).

Pastor, Chris is probably just trying to be respectful of me, because I'm pretty sure he believes her to be Queen.

Chris Jones said...

what is this IF business? ; )

Entirely rhetorical, as I am sure you know, Father. However, if it will make you happy:

Because our Lady is Queen of Heaven, she is Queen of the martyrs even though she is not a martyr herself. She's also Queen of the patriarchs, prophets, doctors, confessors, and every righteous spirit made perfect in faith.

William Weedon said...

There you go, Chris!

Although the good Dr. Luther does not seem to crazy about it, he himself confesses that Queen of Heaven "is a true enough name" for the holy Virgin in his famous commentary on the Magnificat (AE 21:327)

Anonymous said...

I always thought of it in terms of either the Queen Mother who wasn't a Queen by birth, but because she, first, married the King and then because she was the mother of the next King.

cheryl said...

well, i disagree. unless i am misunderstanding the title, it doesn't take into account a great many things.

but i'll leave it there.