10 April 2010

A Liturgical Oddity of the Great 50 Days

is that the Gradual disappears and the Alleluia is doubled in the historic (one year) series from Quasimodo through Pentecost. You have been warned. :)

10 comments:

J.G.F. said...

We're using the Taize Alleluia (951LSB) during Eastertide this year. The cantor's verse, particularly the last "alleluia" he sings, is exquisite in my book :)

William Weedon said...

Us too!

Dan at Necessary Roughness said...

Well, it IS a feast, right? :)

Anonymous said...

How exactly do you use the Taize Alleluia? I cantor often at my church here in Arlington Heights and we haven't done this, but we have done some Taize. I see that there is a little "psalm tone" with a reciting tone of a G that moves through an F to another reciting tone of E. How exactly do you insert the text for the Verse? Also as it is a double verse (with an Alleluia in between) do you just go back to the top and sing the Alleluias and then use the psalm tone again?
Please Help!
Peter Sovitzky

The Rev. BT Ball said...

We are using a sequence hymn -
TLH 187 for the whole of the season. Love the TLH rubrics!

William Weedon said...

Peter,

We sing through the Alleluias once - singing them in G (that's in the Organist edition), then the cantor does the first half of the verse (using tone A), then the Alleluias, then the second part of the verse, also using tone A, and then the Alleluias again.

J.G.F. said...

That's exactly how we do it at Christ.

Mimi said...

Interesting. Thank you for the information.

Anonymous said...

Thank you very much, Pastor. I really enjoy your Blog, by the way.
Peter Sovitzky

Anonymous said...

By the way, LSB 952a is the Celtic Alleluia, which is what I think Pastor Weedon is referring to. It is a step lower than 952 (which is in A). You mentioned singing the alleluia in G (LSB 952a is in G). LSB 951 is the taize and it is in C minor. That is why I was confused. We are going to do 952a on Sunday and I am going to chant the Verse. I think we may do this for the rest of Eastertide.