19 December 2008

I think my favorite

Christmas piece on CPH's new *Heirs of the Reformation: Treasures of the Singing Church* is the Praetorius "Born is a Child". They have it in English (as below), but here it is from the Mass for Christmas Day, serving as the Introit (save it uses the Puer Natus instead of We praise You Jesus as the hymn:



Born is a Child in Bethlehem
Therefore rejoice, Jerusalem.
Alleluia!

Singing and rejoicing let us praise our heavenly Father:
Glory in the highest!

Three kings from Sheba saw the star;
Frankincense, gold, and myrrh brought from far.
Alleluia!

Singing...

My dearest Christ Child, my heart's desire,
My dearest Christ Child, O Jesu.

Praise Him with singing, O all ye Christians,
Praise Him with singing.

We praise You, Jesus, at Your birth
Clothed in flesh You came to earth;
The Virgin bears a sinless boy
And all the angels sing for joy. Alleluia!

The Light eternal, breaking through,
Made the world to gleam anew;
His beams have pierced the core of night,
He makes us children of the light. Alleluia!


Praise God the Father for His love;
He sent the Savior from above.
Alleluia!

Singing...

Praise to the Holy Trinity,
Now and forevermore shall be.
Alleluia!

Singing...

My dearest Christ Child, my heart's desire,
My dearest Christ Child, O Jesu.
Praise Him with singing, O all ye Christians,
Praise Him with singing.

All this for us our God has done,
Granting love through His own Son.
Therefore, all Christendom, rejoice
And sing His praise with endless voice.
Alleluia!

3 comments:

Scott Larkins said...

Yes'ir beautiful.

Thanks.

Chris said...

Is this from the recording "Mass for Christmas Morning?" That's one of my favorites for this time of year.

Darn shame that too many Lutherans have discarded this beautiful music today.

wmc said...

There is no question in my mind that the period of 17th century hymnody and liturgy, which would include Praetorius, Hammerschmidt, Schuetz, Buxtehude, et al, is the finest era of Lutheran music without exception. Yes, I would favor it over the 16th century and even Bach's early 18th c. It is a marvelous mixture of golden age orthodox texts and sturdy, singable tunes sung in interchange between choir and congregation. The Puer natus is a masterpiece.