11 September 2010

Few More Hijacked from Eric Ekong's Facebook (biggest selection on line so far!)



11 comments:

Becky said...

What a glorious day all the way around! Thanks for posting all the pics, Pastor.

William Weedon said...

Becky,

So glad you were able to join in the festivities!

Chris said...

Who is the picture of the man who looks dressed like a Catholic cardinal bishop? And why was he there?

Past Elder said...

That is Walter Obare, bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Kenya. He is a Concordia graduate, but I suspect was invited not because of that but because he has been a courageous spokesman for confessional Lutheranism, all the more remarkable for his church body being a member of the LWF, which has stomped on him for his confessional stand.

For no doubt different reasons than you, Chris, I can do without mediaeval Roman Catholic court garb on Lutheran clergy too, however, that is nothing compared to this man's courage and integrity.

Chris said...

Past Elder, I was not asking about Bishop Obare, but there was a pic of another man with what looked like the standard, non-liturgical dress of a cardinal archbishop. So, who was he and why was he there?

Past Elder said...

Gotcha. In the picture below. I missed the dude altogether, which is a good thing. The RC archdiocese of St Louis sent a rep, so I'm guessing that's who it is, but PW or PTM or someone who was there can really say.

St Louis, "the Rome of the West", has had some powerhouse RC bishops, but neither the current nor the immediate past one has the proverbial red hat.

Not to be confused with the red cap, if you are of sufficient vintage to remember. Red Caps actually did something useful.

William Weedon said...

Yes, he was a monsignor sent by the archbishop of St. Louis. As Pr. McCain notes, we think he might have been blown away by the singing! He had a startled look as the music just kept on rolling out.

Past Elder said...

Something aint't right. The dude is wearing a red sash. Monsignori wear purple sashes.

Was it ever a big deal growing up when Father O'Day, the parish pastor (there were four priests in the parish, now they're lucky to have two) became Monsignor O'Day!

All that monsignor stuff got greatly simplified after VII, but to my knowledge they still wear purple sashes with their Halloween costumes.

Which can get as simple as it likes, but it can't simplify away the essence, which in both sash and title (from the French mon seigneur) derive from the regional notaries of the late Roman Empire which morphed into papal designations and dressed like the noble class, nothing whatever to do with Christ or his Church.

I think Monsignor O'Day was an honourary titular protonotary. That's usually what they were outside of Rome.

There's gotta be a guest list somewhere.

Past Elder said...

PS -- I mentioned over at PTM's, a startled look may have been jealousy, depending on his liturgical orientation.

Congregational singing has been widely, and unsuccessfully as a whole. promoted since VII as a means of congregational participation in worship.

As I was raised, congregational singing *interrupts* the flow of the Mass in which one is to participate; any hymns were before or after the Mass itself, with music during the Mass being settings of a Mass part.

Or put more simply, as we thought then, it's something Protestants do to fill up what they lost when they lost the Mass. My dad, a 1941 RC convert, often remarked that they let in all the stuff he though he had left behind for something better.

richard739 said...

Is there any significance in the fact (as far as I can see from the press release) that the only other denomination represented at the service were the RCs? Whilst it's great that they turned up were the ELCA or episcopalians there?

William Weedon said...

Oh, there was a representative from the ELCA present as well, I believe. I don't recall anything about the Episcopalians.