05 April 2011

As you have no doubt noticed...

from the Old Lutheran Quotes of the day, I've taken up Pastor Petersen's challenge to read *Bondage of the Will* by Luther (and a joy it is to read on the iPad).  I've attempted to read it several times, but never got all that far into it.  This time I have pressed on and must confess that I could kick myself for not having slogged on before now.  True, I am itching to edit it - it cries out for it! - and I'd love to see the work boiled down to its essence: the demolition (sans insults) of Erasmus' position and the fortification of the Scriptural position that is at the heart of this masterpiece, where Luther dares to let God be God.  It is odd how much of Nagel's instruction came ringing back:  "everything that is believed must be hidden," "sub contrarii" and "if God wants to be a God of the law, you can't stop Him."  Luther hits head on the fact that to human reason and judgment, God's "justice" is appalling (and he's honest enough to note we don't have the same problem when He is being gracious - that is, if it is to our advantage, we think that seems natural and right - old man still in the driver seat there).  Anywho, just wanted to encourage one and all to take up Pr. Petersen's challenge on this.  It honestly does go right to the heart of the "functional Arminianism" (HT: Pr. Curtis) that plagues us and it, well, rather ruthlessly cuts its heart out.

4 comments:

Bryan said...

I've been thinking of also taking up this challenge - and thank you for your encouragement, dear brother Weedon. But I must ask, is Apple paying you? Your posts regarding this "ipad" wonder have been causing me a little "bondage of my will" of late.

Happy Lent from a brother out in the wild west. (Really do appreciate the blog, though)

Rev. Allen Bergstrazer said...

I shall as well. I have the Dillenberger edition around here somewhere, by the way which platform are you using to read it on your iPad?

Anonymous said...

Wil,
I could have told you similar things about Luther's Bondage of the Will. I don't remember if I read it during Seminary or college, I think Seminary. Thank you for the reminder, I should re-read it.
Good thoughts about Luther's masterpiece. I do think that you should let Luther be Luther though, leave the insults in. ;-)
Benjamin Pollock

William Weedon said...

Am reading it on logos from Luther's Works.