19 November 2008

Commemoration of Elizabeth of Hungary

From our Synod's website (and the Treasury of Daily Prayer):

Born in Pressburg, Hungary, in 1207, Elizabeth was the daughter of King Andrew II and his wife Gertrude. Given as a bride in an arranged political marriage, Elizabeth became the wife of Louis of Thuringia in Germany at the age of 14. She had a spirit of Christian generosity and charity, and the home she established for her husband and three children in the Wartburg Castle at Eisenach was known for its hospitality and family love. Elizabeth often supervised the care of the sick and needy and even gave up her bed to a leper at one time. Widowed at the age of 20, she made provisions for her children and entered into an austere life as a nun in the Order of Saint Francis. Her self-denial led to failing health and an early death in 1231 at the age of 24. Remembered for her self-sacrificing ways, Elizabeth is commemorated through the many hospitals named for her around the world.

The Treasury offers a beautiful prayer for the day, asking God to "inspire in us the humility and benevolent charity of Elizabeth of Hungary." (p. 929) She is a shining light for Christ's people, pointing the way to live welcoming every person as Christ, and every need and suffering as His own.

4 comments:

Rev. Gerson Flor said...

Kudos to the editors of the TDP! After such an entry, how refreshing to read the suggested passage from the Apology. Yes, it is a Lutheran breviary indeed!

Dr Matt Phillips said...

Did you mention the miracle of the roses on Issues, etc?

Most Lutherans are surprised when they go to the Warburg and see that most of the rooms have more about Elizabeth than Luther.

Doorman-Priest said...

She is on the medieval carved altarpiece in my placement church in Tallinn.

Just in case you were interested.

I could see why you might not be.

Christine said...

Most Lutherans are surprised when they go to the Warburg and see that most of the rooms have more about Elizabeth than Luther.

Elizabeth is revered among Catholics as a sign pointing to love of God being fulfilled in love of neighbor. Union with Christ does that, as we all know.