15 October 2007

Finished!

Whew!  At long last, the updating of Starck's classic book of prayer has been shipped off to CPH - a month and a half before it was due, no less.  Hopefully they'll be happy with it, and other folks will be blessed with those beautiful words that have filled my days for the last year.  Starck's Prayer Book gives the lie to the notion that Lutherans taught simply a legal fiction about justification, and that there was no concern for mystical union.  It also is replete with very rich prayer to each person of the Blessed Trinity, acknowledgment of the holy angels, and a powerful confession of human impotence and God's all supplying grace.  

6 comments:

wm cwirla said...

Congratulations! I need to learn from you how to make deadline.

Dixie said...

You overachiever...you know, it's people like you that make it hard on the rest of us!

When I was Lutheran, as far as prayer books went, nothing could hold a candle to Gerhard's Sacred Meditations (the Heisler translation...not the Johnston translation). I note you used to reference Sacred Meditations with a reasonable frequency. How does Krauth compare?

Oh...and who was he and what was his Lutheran claim to fame?

Congrats on beating the deadline. Unfortunately...I will, as the engineers say...continue in my old habits of "riding the red line".

saxoniae said...

Pr. Weedon, what did you update? I thought the Concordia/Pieper/Dau edition was great the way it was. It only needed a paperback version. :)

Krauth - he wrote The Conservative Reformation. I'm reading it now. Didn't he have something to do with our definition of church fellowship?

William Weedon said...

Thanks, all.

Dixie,

Gerhard's Sacred Meditations are without par. But they are not truly a prayer book, but a meditations book. Starck is a prayer book, morning and evening prayers for the week, with daily meditations, and prayers for the Church year, prayers for various conditions and especially a focus on prayers in sickness and in death.

Krauth was an American Lutheran in the 19th century, probably the greatest mind that American Lutheranism ever produced. A great theologian, but not a devotional writer.

Saxionae, hey, what you NEED is both versions - the Dau translation and the Weedon update. The update really is just that, a gentle attempt to make it a bit of an easier read for the ear not attuned to the beauty of the KJV, and keyed as far as the hymns go to the LSB.

Scot K said...

wm cwirla said...
Congratulations! I need to learn from you how to make deadline.



I will just shut my mouth.....

wm cwirla said...

Probably a good idea if you want to see the remainder of the work for which you are waiting!